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  • Sleep deprivation handicaps the brain's ability to form new memories, mouse study shows

    3rd Feb 17

    Studying mice, scientists have fortified evidence that a key purpose of sleep is to recalibrate the brain cells responsible for learning and memory so the animals can 'solidify' lessons learned and use them when they awaken -- in the case of nocturnal mice, the next evening.

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  • Sleep research high-resolution images show how the brain resets during sleep

    3rd Feb 17

    Striking electron microscope pictures from inside the brains of mice suggest what happens in our own brain every day: Our synapses -- the junctions between nerve cells -- grow strong and large during the stimulation of daytime, then shrink by nearly 20 percent while we sleep, creating room for more growth and learning the next day.

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  • Study points to a universal immune mechanism as a regulator of sleep

    3rd Feb 17

    Sleep may be regulated in part by several brain-based immune proteins collectively called inflammasome NLRP3, suggests new research conducted in mice.

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  • Scientists utilize innovative neuroimaging approach to unravel complex brain networks

    3rd Feb 17

    A research team has used an innovative neuroimaging tool to interrogate the complex brain networks and functions.

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  • Researchers outline new policies for earlier detection of autism in children

    3rd Feb 17

    The earlier that autism is diagnosed and treated in children, the better outcomes they will experience for future relationships and careers. However, most children aren't detected and diagnosed with ASD until around age four, with children from economically disadvantaged or minority backgrounds detected and diagnosed up to two years later, on average. Researchers recommend that children be universally screened for ASD at 18 months and again at 24 months, among other strategies.

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  • Scientists identify two brain networks influencing how we make decisions

    3rd Feb 17

    Scientists have pinpointed two distinct mechanisms in the human brain that control the balance between speed and accuracy when making decisions.

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  • With mini-vessels, mini-brains expand research potential

    3rd Feb 17

    Mini-brains produce networks of capillaries, an important anatomical feature for lab studies of stroke and other circulation-related brain diseases, report invesitagors.

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  • Immune system suppression may be related to problem drinking

    3rd Feb 17

    Cytokines are small proteins in the immune system that act as chemical messengers between cells. Prior research suggests that pro- and anti-inflammatory cytokines are dysfunctional during alcohol dependence and may contribute to the progression from healthy to problem drinking. This study compared social and non-dependent problem drinkers on the impact of alcohol-related changes in the body’s immune response to stress, alcohol-cue induced craving and anxiety, motivation to drink, and alcohol consumption.

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  • Addicted individuals less responsive to reward-anticipation

    3rd Feb 17

    It may be difficult for addicted individuals to learn when they can expect a reward. This learning problem could perhaps explain why they are more prone to addiction and find it difficult to kick the habit. Researchers reached this conclusion on the basis of an extensive meta-analysis of the brain imaging literature.

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  • Antidepressants Induce Resilience and Reverse Susceptibility

    3rd Feb 17

    When they work, antidepressant medications may take weeks or months to alleviate symptoms of depression. Progress in developing new and more effective antidepressant treatments has been limited, though a new study offers new insights into how antidepressants work.

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  • Lasting autistic traits in women with anorexia

    3rd Feb 17

    Women with anorexia display clear autistic traits, even once the eating disorder is under control and they have achieved a normal weight, according to research. The similarities between anorexia and autism in women are also seen in a part of the brain which process social skills.

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  • Nicotine creates a chronic drug memory in the brain

    3rd Feb 17

    A researcher reports a surprise that came after three months into her study on nicotine abstinence, when lab rats suddenly became fearless and sought out well-lighted areas that prey animals normally avoid. At the same time, signaling in the brain’s reward system changed, as shown by a study.

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  • Revolutionary approach for treating glioblastoma works with human cells

    2nd Feb 17

    Researchers describe how human stem cells, made from human skin cells, can hunt down and kill human brain cancer, a critical and monumental step toward clinical trials -- and real treatment.

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  • Scientists show deep brain stimulation blocks heroin relapse in rats

    2nd Feb 17

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) can greatly reduce the compulsion to use heroin in standard rat models of addiction, new research has demonstrated.

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  • Social biases contribute to challenges for those with autism

    2nd Feb 17

    Negative first impressions formed by potential social partners may reduce the quality of social experiences for people with autism, new research concludes. In the study, non-autistic participants reported their first impressions of individuals with autism from videos of them during social interaction.

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  • Teens, young adults explore differently

    2nd Feb 17

    Adolescents don't necessarily have 'faulty' decision-making, psychologists have discovered. They simply value different kinds of information. The researchers found that young adults do more 'directed exploration,' or exploration driven by information seeking, than teens.

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  • Wearable AI system can detect a conversation's tone

    2nd Feb 17

    Scientists have developed an artificially intelligent, wearable system that can predict if a conversation is happy, sad, or neutral based on a person's speech patterns and vitals. Coupled with audio and vital-sign data, deep-learning system could someday serve as a 'social coach' for people with anxiety or Asperger's, they say.

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  • Targeting Parkinson's-linked protein could neutralize two of the disease's causes

    2nd Feb 17

    Researchers report they have discovered how two problem proteins known to cause Parkinson's disease are chemically linked, suggesting that someday, both could be neutralized by a single drug designed to target the link.

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  • Early signs of anxiety, depression may be evident in the brains of newborns

    2nd Feb 17

    Early predictors of anxiety and depression may be evident in the brain even at birth, suggests a new study.

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  • Brain-computer interface allows completely locked-in people to communicate

    1st Feb 17

    A computer interface that can decipher the thoughts of people who are unable to communicate could revolutionize the lives of those living with completely locked-in syndrome, according to a new article. Counter to expectations, the participants in the study reported being "happy," despite their extreme condition.

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  • Astronauts' brains change shape during spaceflight

    1st Feb 17

    MRIs before and after space missions reveal that astronauts' brains compress and expand during spaceflight, according to a new study.

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  • Researchers generate rat model of autism

    1st Feb 17

    A study has found that oxytocin improves behavioral and electrophysiological deficits in a novel Shank3-deficient rat.

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  • Autism may begin early in brain development

    1st Feb 17

    An overload of neural connections typically observed in autistic brains begins early in mammalian development, when key neurons in the brain region known as the cerebral cortex begin to form their first circuits, new research shows. By pinpointing where and when autism-related neural defects first emerge in mice, the study results could lead to a stronger understanding of autism in humans -- including possible early intervention strategies.

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  • Air pollution may lead to dementia in older women

    1st Feb 17

    Tiny air pollution particles -- the type that mainly comes from power plants and automobiles -- may greatly increase the chance of dementia, including Alzheimer's disease. Scientists and engineers found that older women who live in places with fine particulate matter exceeding the US Environmental Protection Agency's standard are 81 percent more at risk for global cognitive decline and 92 percent more likely to develop dementia, including Alzheimer's.

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  • Drug candidate stabilizes essential transport mechanism in nerve cells

    1st Feb 17

    New research has discovered how a drug candidate works to possibly alleviate Alzheimer's disease and autism spectrum disorders.

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  • New research points to potential treatment for memory loss activating a protein dysregulated in dementia

    31st Jan 17

    A new study reveals a new molecular mechanism essential for associative memory encoding in the hippocampus. This brain region is highly affected pathologically at early stages of several neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer´s disease.

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  • Early brain changes in fragile X syndrome, study shows

    31st Jan 17

    A new study is giving researchers a first look at the early stages of brain development in patients with Fragile X syndrome, a disorder that causes mild to severe intellectual disability and is the most common genetic cause of autism spectrum disorder.

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  • What primary care providers should know about diabetic neuropathy

    31st Jan 17

    Endocrinologists and neurologists from both sides of the Atlantic and teamed up with the American Diabetes Association to craft a new position statement on the prevention, treatment and management of diabetic neuropathy.

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  • Scientists illuminate the neurons of social attraction

    31st Jan 17

    The ancient impulse to procreate is necessary for survival and must be hardwired into our brains. Now scientists have discovered an important clue about the neurons involved in that wiring. With a whiff of the opposite sex, certain hormone-sensitive neurons trigger pro-social behavior in mice and could play roles in anxiety, depression, and other mood-related conditions in humans

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  • Brain potassium channels may unlock future precision medicine approaches for alcoholism

    31st Jan 17

    Researchers have identified novel potassium (K+) channel genes within addiction brain circuitry that are altered by alcohol dependence and correlate with drinking levels in a mouse model of alcohol drinking.

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  • Mental activities may protect against mild cognitive impairment

    31st Jan 17

    Researchers have found that engaging in mentally stimulating activities, even late in life, may protect against new-onset mild cognitive impairment, which is the intermediate stage between normal cognitive aging and dementia. The study found that cognitively normal people 70 or older who engaged in computer use, craft activities, social activities and playing games had a decreased risk of developing mild cognitive impairment.

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  • Practice makes perfect, and 'overlearning' locks it in

    31st Jan 17

    People who continued to train on a visual task for 20 minutes past the point of mastery locked in that learning, shielding it from interference by new learning, a new study shows.

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  • A glitch in 'gatekeeper cells' slowly suffocates the brain

    31st Jan 17

    Abnormality with special cells that wrap around blood vessels in the brain leads to neuron deterioration, possibly affecting the development of Alzheimer's disease, a study reveals. 'Gatekeeper cells' called pericytes surround blood vessels. They contract and dilate to control blood flow to active parts of the brain. Pericyte degeneration may be ground zero for neurodegenerative disorders like Alzheimer's disease, ALS and possibly others, researchers said.

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  • Researchers identify drug that alleviates opioid withdrawal

    31st Jan 17

    Opioid use and abuse is a significant social, health and economic issue. Researchers have discovered that an existing anti-gout medication is effective in reducing the severity of withdrawal symptoms in opioid-dependent rodents. For their study, the researchers looked specifically at two common opioid drugs: morphine and fentanyl.

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  • Kids should pay more attention to mistakes, study suggests

    31st Jan 17

    Children who believe intelligence can grow pay more attention to and bounce back from their mistakes more effectively than kids who think intelligence is fixed, indicates a new study that measured the young participants’ brain waves.

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  • Paving the way for peripheral nerve damage repair

    31st Jan 17

    Research has for the first time identified how a bodily protein allows nerves of the peripheral nervous system (PNS) to repair following injury.

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  • Deciphering the emergence of neuronal diversity

    31st Jan 17

    Neuroscientists have analyzed the diversity of inhibitory interneurons during the developmental period surrounding birth. They have discovered the emergence of three main sub-groups of interneurons by decoding the expression of cell-type specific genes as well as their exact, and often unexpected, location in the cortex. These results should help researchers in discovering how psychiatric-related genetic disturbances impact the emergence of neuronal sub-types and how to design novel cell-type specific interventions.

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  • The attraction effect: How our brains can be influenced

    31st Jan 17

    The decisions we make are influenced by other possibilities that we did not choose. At the same time, the options we missed out on determine our satisfaction with the outcomes of situations we were unable to control. Psychologists conducted two experiments: first, they studied the decision-making behavior of students and, second, they measured brain activity and satisfaction when a set of possibilities is supplemented with another alternative.

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  • Rebalancing gut microbiome lengthens survival in mouse model of ALS

    30th Jan 17

    A bacterial by-product known to be important in maintaining gut health may slow the progression of amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, or ALS -- a progressive, neurodegenerative disease.

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  • Combined use of alcohol, cocaine may play a unique role in suicide risk

    28th Jan 17

    Alcohol use can be found in suicide deaths and unintentional deaths due to injuries such as those from motor vehicle collisions (MVCs). The authors of a new study argue that it is important to distinguish between the roles that alcohol may play in the two different types of deaths. Consequently, they compared postmortem toxicology results for alcohol and other drugs, alone and in combination, in suicide and MVC deaths.

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  • Scientists find brain hormone that triggers fat burning

    28th Jan 17

    Biologists have identified a brain hormone that appears to trigger fat burning in the gut. Their findings in animal models could have implications for future pharmaceutical development.

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  • Research suggests way to improve stroke treatments

    28th Jan 17

    Working with animal models, researchers now have demonstrated the potential of giving a drug in combination with tPA that might improve stroke outcomes and increase the window of opportunity for the therapy.

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  • Roots of Alzheimer's disease can extend as far back as the womb

    28th Jan 17

    Biochemical reactions that cause Alzheimer's disease could begin in the womb or just after birth if the fetus or newborn does not get enough vitamin A, according to new research. These new findings, based on studies of genetically-engineered mice, also demonstrate that supplements given to newborns with low levels of vitamin A could be effective in slowing the degenerative brain disease.

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  • Antibodies as 'messengers' in the nervous system

    28th Jan 17

    Antibodies are able to activate human nerve cells within milliseconds and hence modify their function -- that is the surprising conclusion of a new study. This knowledge improves our understanding of illnesses that accompany certain types of cancer, above all severe intestinal malfunctions.

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  • Premature babies don't use sensory-prediction brain process that may be key to development

    27th Jan 17

    Babies born prematurely don't use their expectations about the world to shape their brains as babies born at full term do, important evidence that this neural process is important to development.

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  • Answers to how our brains make meaning, with the help of a little LSD

    27th Jan 17

    We all have particular experiences or particular things -- a favorite song, for example -- that mean much more to us than others. Now, researchers who've studied how perceptions of meaning change when people take the psychedelic drug known as LSD have traced that sense of meaningfulness to particular neurochemicals and receptors in the brain.

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  • LSD alters perception via serotonin receptors

    27th Jan 17

    Researchers have discovered how the perception of meaning changes in the brain under the influence of LSD. The serotonin 2A receptors are responsible for altered perception. This finding will help develop new courses of pharmacotherapy for psychiatric disorders such as depression, addictions or phobias.

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  • Study in teens shows that brain responses to rewards are linked to pain sensitivity

    27th Jan 17

    Patterns of brain responses to rewards are a significant predictor of pain symptoms -- a link that is already present by adolescence -- and may be influenced by gene variants affecting pain sensitivity, reports a new study.

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  • New drug SAK3 may offer hope to Alzheimer's disease patients

    27th Jan 17

    Acetylcholine is a neurotransmitter in the brain that plays an important role in controlling attention and cognition. Acetylcholine system dysfunction is believed to be one of the causes of Alzheimer's disease (AD) and vascular dementia.

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  • Eye muscles are resilient to ALS

    27th Jan 17

    Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis, commonly known as ALS, is an incurable neurodegenerative disease that affects all voluntary muscles in the body leading to paralysis and breathing difficulties. Eye muscles, in contrast to other muscles, generally retain their mobility even in the final stages of the disease.

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  • Autism researchers discover genetic 'Rosetta Stone'

    27th Jan 17

    Distinct sets of genetic defects in a single neuronal protein can lead either to infantile epilepsy or to autism spectrum disorders (ASDs), depending on whether the respective mutations boost the protein's function or sabotage it, according to a new study.

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  • Brain shape linked to personality differences

    27th Jan 17

    The shape of your brain can influence personality traits, according to a new study.

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  • Echolocation: Sizing up spaces by ear

    27th Jan 17

    Humans can be trained to use echolocation to estimate the sizes of enclosed spaces. Researchers now show that the learning process involves close coordination between sensory and motor cortex.

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  • New insights into brain circuit for hunger responses during starvation

    27th Jan 17

    Researchers uncover mechanism by which hypothalamic neural signaling drives hunger responses to survive starvation.

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  • Delaying marijuana smoking to age 17 cuts risks to teens' brains, new study suggests

    26th Jan 17

    Adolescents who smoke marijuana as early as 14 do worse by 20 points on some cognitive tests and drop out of school at a higher rate than non-smokers. But if they hold off until age 17, they're less at risk.

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  • Hypoxia due to CHD linked to abnormal neurogenesis and impaired cortical growth

    26th Jan 17

    The subventricular zone in normal newborns' brains is home to the largest stockpile of neural stem/progenitor cells, with newly generated neurons migrating from this zone to specific regions of the frontal cortex and differentiating into interneurons. When newborns experience disruptions in cerebral oxygen supply due to congenital heart disease, essential cellular processes go awry and this contributes to reduced cortical growth.

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  • Drug compound halts Alzheimer's-related damage in mice

    26th Jan 17

    In some people, the normal brain protein tau collects into toxic tangles that damage brain cells and contributes to diseases such as Alzheimer's. Now, researchers report that they have found a drug can lower tau levels and prevent some of the neurological damage. The findings suggest a potential treatment for tau-related neurodegenerative diseases.

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  • New clues on the base of Parkinson's disease, other 'synucleinopathies'

    26th Jan 17

    New techniques map alpha-syuclein toxicity, spatial location, and links to Parkinson's genes, report investigators in a new article.

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  • Stimulating the brain with electricity may reduce bulimia symptoms

    26th Jan 17

    Key symptoms of bulimia nervosa, including the urge to binge eat and restrict food intake, are reduced by delivering electricity to parts of the brain using non-invasive brain stimulation, according to new research.

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  • Some specialized neurons are for processing faces

    26th Jan 17

    Neurons specialized for processing faces in the human brain are controlled by attention, according to a new study.

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  • Exploring the unknown: Electrophysiological and behavioural measures of visuospatial learning

    3rd Feb 16

    by Brendan Quinlivan, John S. Butler, Abdur Raquib Ridwan, Ines Beiser, Laura Williams, Eavan McGovern, Sean O’Riordan, Michael Hutchinson, Richard B. Reilly Abstract Visuospatial memory describes our ability to temporarily store and manipulate visual and spatial information and is employed for a wide variety of complex cognitive tasks. Here a visuospatial learning task requiring fine […]

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  • Ph.D. Student in Guildford/UK

    2nd Feb 16

    Application are invited from UK and EU residents to join a multidisciplinary team of scientists studying the interaction between sleep, circadian rhythms and cognitive functions within the Sleep Research Centre at the University of Surrey. The studentship is available from academic year 2016/17 for 3 years and is fully funded through the School of Biosciences […]

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  • Post-doctoral position in Utrecht/Netherlands

    1st Feb 16

    Pieter Roelfsema and J. Alexander Heimel have a joint post-doc position available to study neural processing in the awake behaving mouse using imaging at cellular and mesoscopic resolution, extracellular electrophysiology and optogenetics. The research is part of a European funded collaboration with the laboratories of Gustavo Deco (Barcelona) and Hans op de Beeck (Leuven). Funding […]

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  • Traumatic Brain Injury and Obesity Induce Persistent Central Insulin Resistance

    1st Feb 16

    by Kate Karelina, Benjamin Sarac, Lindsey M. Freeman, Kristopher R. Gaier, Zachary M. Weil Abstract Traumatic brain injury (TBI)-induced impairments in cerebral energy metabolism impede tissue repair and contribute to delayed functional recovery. Moreover, the transient alteration in brain glucose utilization corresponds to a period of increased vulnerability to the negative effects of a subsequent […]

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  • Searching for cognitive enhancement in the Morris watermaze: Better and worse performance in D-amino acid oxidase knockout (Dao-/-) mice

    1st Feb 16

    by David Pritchett, Amy M. Taylor, Christopher Barkus, Sandra J. Engle, Nicholas J. Brandon, Trevor Sharp, Russell G. Foster, Paul J. Harrison, Stuart N. Peirson, David M. Bannerman Abstract A common strategy when searching for cognitive enhancing drugs has been to target the NMDA receptor, given its putative role in synaptic plasticity and learning. Evidence […]

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  • Neurochemical and behavioral indices of exercise reward are independent of exercise controllability

    1st Feb 16

    by Jonathan J Herrera, Sofiya Fedynska, Parsa R Ghasem, Tyler Wieman, Peter J Clark, Nathan Gray, Esteban Loetz, Serge Campeau, Monika Fleshner, Benjamin N Greenwood Abstract Brain reward circuits are implicated in stress-related psychiatric disorders. Exercise reduces the incidence of stress-related disorders, but the contribution of exercise reward to stress resistance is unknown. Exercise-induced stress […]

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  • Microglia-Derived Purines Modulate Mossy Fiber Synaptic Transmission and Plasticity through P2X4 and A1 Receptors

    1st Feb 16

    by Jimmy George, Rodrigo A. Cunha, Christophe Mulle, Thierry Amédée Abstract Recent data have provided evidence that microglia, the brain resident macrophage-like cells, modulate neuronal activity in both physiological and pathophysiological conditions and consequently microglia are now recognized as synaptic partners. Among different neuromodulators, purines, which are produced and be released by microglia, have emerged […]

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  • Diffuse traumatic axonal injury in mice induces complex behavioral alterations that are normalized by neutralization of interleukin- 1β

    1st Feb 16

    by Sara Ekmark-Lewén, Johanna Flygt, Gudrun A. Fridgeirsdottir, Olivia Kiwanuka, Anders Hånell, Bengt J. Meyerson, Anis K. Mir, Hermann Gram, Anders Lewén, Fredrik Clausen, Lars Hillered, Niklas Marklund Abstract Widespread traumatic axonal injury (TAI) results in brain network dysfunction which commonly leads to persisting cognitive and behavioral impairments following traumatic brain injury (TBI). TBI induces […]

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  • Subcellular calcium dynamics during juvenile development in mouse hippocampal astrocytes

    1st Feb 16

    by Ryota Nakayama, Takuya Sasaki, Kenji F. Tanaka, Yuji Ikegaya Abstract Astrocytes generate calcium signals throughout their fine processes, which are assumed to locally regulate neighboring neurotransmission and blood flow. The intercellular morphological relationships mature during juvenile periods when astrocytes elongate highly ramified processes. In this study, we examined developmental changes in calcium activity patterns […]

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  • Oscillations in the embryonic chick olfactory bulb: initial expression and development revealed by optical imaging with a voltage-sensitive dye

    1st Feb 16

    by Katsushige Sato, Shihori Hayashi, Motoki Inaji, Yoko Momose-Sato Abstract In our previous study, we applied a multiple-site optical recording technique with a voltage-sensitive dye to the embryonic chick olfactory system and showed that functional synaptic transmission in the olfactory bulb was expressed at the embryonic 6-7-day stage. It is known that oscillations, i.e., stereotyped […]

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  • Striatonigral control of movement velocity in mice

    1st Feb 16

    by Ryan A. Bartholomew, Haofang Li, Erin J. Gaidis, Michelle Stackmann, Charles T. Shoemaker, Mark A. Rossi, Henry H. Yin Abstract The basal ganglia have long been implicated in action initiation. Using three-dimensional motion capture, we quantified the effects of optogenetic stimulation of the striatonigral (direct) pathway on movement kinematics. We generated transgenic mice with […]

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  • Commercial position in Germany

    30th Jan 16

    Encepharm operates an in vivo contract research laboratory. We perform pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic studies with the focus on neuroscience. Encepharm is located in Göttingen, Germany. At Encepharm we are looking for a colleague to strengthen our Trial Management team. The successful candidate will be responsible for the overall progress of various studies. This will include […]

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  • Postgraduate Research Associate/Research Assistant (Fixed Term) in Cambridge/UK

    29th Jan 16

    An opening is available for a Postdoctoral Research Associate/Research Assistant in Behavioural Neuroscience to join The Translational Cognitive Neuroscience Laboratory in the Department of Psychology, University of Cambridge. The TCN Lab pioneered the development of rodent cognitive assessments using touchscreen technology and has successfully demonstrated the utility of these assays in characterising cognitive phenotypes in […]

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  • Post-doctoral position in Zamudio (Bilbao)/Spain

    28th Jan 16

    I am looking for an electrphysiologist to apply for an EMBO Long Term Postdoctoral Fellowship to join my Neural Stem Cells and Neurogenesis Lab. We want to investigate the reciprocal influence of Neural Stem Cells and hippocampal neurons in normal conditions, aging and epilepsy. more

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  • Post-doctoral position in San Antonio, Texas/USA

    28th Jan 16

    A NIH-funded postdoctoral position is open to study neuron-glia interaction and synaptic physiology in the laboratory of Dr. Jun Hee Kim in the Department of Physiology at the University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio (UTHSCSA, http://physiology.uthscsa.edu/faculty-profile/327). We are seeking a highly motivated PhD or PhD candidate with research background in electrophysiology and […]

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  • Post-doctoral position in San Diego, CA/USA

    27th Jan 16

    We are seeking a motivated postdoctoral fellow to work in the area of neural circuits and neuroendocrine biology of metabolism. It is now well-established that body fat is under the control of brain circuits, independent of the effects of food intake. In the context of living animals, the neuroendocrine signals and physiology of body fat […]

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  • Post-doctoral position in Solna/Sweden

    26th Jan 16

    Postdoctoral studies in Alzheimer’s research (scholarship) “Prevention of Amyloidogenic Peptide-Induced Network and Cognitive Deficits by Activation of Peptide Degradation Mechanisms” Division The Center for Alzheimer Research is an innovative and translational combination of 5 divisions in the NVS department engaged in translational research on neurodegenerative diseases and aging. Research concentrates on pre-clinical as well as […]

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  • Involvement of spinal α2-adrenoceptors in prolonged modulation of hind limb withdrawal reflexes following acute noxious stimulation in the anaesthetised rabbit

    25th Jan 16

    by John Harris Abstract The role of spinal α2-adrenoceptors in mediating long-lasting modulation of hind limb withdrawal reflexes following acute noxious chemical stimulation of distant heterotopic and local homotopic locations has been investigated in pentobarbitone-anaesthetised rabbits. Reflexes evoked in the ankle extensor muscle medial gastrocnemius (MG) by electrical stimulation of the ipsilateral heel, and reflexes […]

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  • Model of anesthetic induction by unilateral intracerebral microinjection of GABAergic agonists

    25th Jan 16

    by Marshall Devor, Vladimir Zalkind, Yelena Fishman, Anne Minert Abstract General anesthetic agents induce loss of consciousness coupled with suppression of movement, analgesia and amnesia. Although these diverse functions are mediated by neural structures located in wide-ranging parts of the neuraxis, anesthesia can be induced rapidly and reversibly by bilateral microinjection of minute quantities of […]

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  • The contribution of inner and outer retinal photoreceptors to infra-slow oscillations in the rat olivary pretectal nucleus

    25th Jan 16

    by Patrycja Orlowska-Feuer, Annette E. Allen, Riccardo Storchi, Hanna J. Szkudlarek, Marian H. Lewandowski Abstract A subpopulation of olivary pretectal nucleus (OPN) neurons discharges action potentials in an oscillatory manner, with a period of approximately two minutes. This ‘infra-slow’ oscillatory activity depends on synaptic excitation originating in the retina. Signals from rod-cone photoreceptors reach the […]

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  • Postdoc positions – computational neuroscience or systems biology in Stockholm/Sweden

    24th Jan 16

    KTH Royal Institute of Technology, Stockholm, is currently recruiting three different postdocs to be working within the Human Brain Project: (1) Postdoc or application expert – specifically development of brain modeling tools. Specifically for the current position software applications providing user-friendly interface to cellular-level modelling tools will be developed, supported and used. These will include […]

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  • Post-doctoral position in Buffalo, NY/USA

    23rd Jan 16

    We are inviting applications for a postdoctoral position in the recently established laboratory of Dr. Beirowski (http://hjkri.buffalo.edu/beirowski.html) at the Hunter James Kelly Research Institute in Buffalo, New York State. The Beirowski lab focuses on elucidating the molecular mechanisms of the degeneration of axons, the longest cellular projections of neurons, using a broad repertoire of innovative […]

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  • Masters Thesis in Vienna/Austria

    23rd Jan 16

    Applications are invited for a 12 month Masters thesis at the Institute of Molecular Pathology (IMP) in Vienna in the laboratory of Dr David Keays focused on cortical development. The human cortex is arguably the most complex structure on the planet comprised of more than 85 billion neurons, and in excess of 100 trillion synapses. […]

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  • Ph.D. Student in Stuttgart/Germany

    22nd Jan 16

    A PhD position in cellular neurobiology (TV-L E13/65%) is available at the Institute of Cell Biology and Immunology in the lab of Angelika Hausser. The potential candidate will investigate how protein kinase D coordinates the vesicular trafficking of AMPA receptors to and within dendrites in hippocampal neurons thereby ensuring their proper synaptic localization and function. […]

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  • Sources of bias in single-trial normalization procedures

    22nd Jan 16

    by Andrei Ciuparu, Raul C. Mureşan Abstract Baseline normalization procedures are essential for the analysis of brain activity. These use statistics of a reference (baseline) period to normalize data along the entire trial (baseline and stimulus periods). A very popular procedure is the pseudo z-scoring, traditionally applied to time-frequency spectral power estimates, where it was […]

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  • Knockdown of ASK1 affects ischemia-induced astrocyte activation and glial scar formation

    22nd Jan 16

    by So Yeong Cheon, Kyoung Joo Cho, Juhyun Song, Gyung Whan Kim Abstract Reactive astrocytes play an essential role in determining the tissue response to ischemia. Formation of glial scar can block neuronal outgrowth that is required for restoration of damaged tissue. Therefore, regulation of astrocyte activation is important, however, the mediator of this process […]

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  • An obesity-associated risk allele within the FTO gene affects brain activity for areas important for emotion, impulse control, and reward in response to food images

    22nd Jan 16

    by Lyle Wiemerslage, Emil K Nilsson, Linda Solstrand Dahlberg, Fia Ence-Eriksson, Sandra Castillo, Anna L Larsen, Simon BA Bylund, Pleunie S Hogenkamp, Gaia Olivo, Marcus Bandstein, Olga E Titova, Elna-Marie Larsson, Christian Benedict, Samantha J Brooks, Helgi B Schiöth Abstract Understanding how genetics influences obesity, brain activity, and eating behavior will add important insight for […]

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  • The Role of the Dorsolateral Prefrontal Cortex in Context-Dependent Motor Performance

    22nd Jan 16

    by Ya-Yun Lee, Carolee J. Winstein, Beth E. Fisher Abstract Context-dependent motor performance is a phenomenon in which people perform better in the environmental context where they originally practiced a task. Some animal and computer simulation studies suggested that context-dependent performance may be associated with neural activation of the dorsolateral prefrontal cortex (DLPFC). This study […]

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  • Reward association facilitates distractor suppression in visual search

    22nd Jan 16

    by Mengyuan Gong, Feitong Yang, Sheng Li Abstract Although valuable objects are attractive in nature, people often encounter situations where they would prefer to avoid such distraction while focusing on the task goal. Contrary to the typical phenomenon of attentional capture by reward-associated item, we provide evidence for a facilitation effect derived from the active […]

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  • Cognitive flexibility modulates maturation and music-training-related changes of neural sound discrimination

    22nd Jan 16

    by Katri Saarikivi, Vesa Putkinen, Mari Tervaniemi, Minna Huotilainen Abstract Previous research has demonstrated that musicians show superior neural sound discrimination when compared to non-musicians and that these changes emerge with accumulation of training. Our aim was to investigate whether individual differences in executive functions predict training-related changes in neural sound discrimination. We measured event-related […]

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  • Cognitive load and autonomic response patterns under negative priming demand in Depersonalisation-Derealisation Disorder

    22nd Jan 16

    by Erwin Lemche, Mauricio Sierra-Siegert, Anthony S. David, Mary L. Phillips, David Gasston, Steven C.R. Williams, Vincent P. Giampietro Abstract Previous studies have yielded evidence for cognitive processing abnormalities and alterations of autonomic functioning in Depersonalization-Derealization Disorder (DPRD). However multimodal neuroimaging and psychophysiology studies have not yet been conducted to test for functional and effective […]

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  • Differential effects of hunger and satiety on insular cortex and hypothalamic functional connectivity

    22nd Jan 16

    by Hazel Wright, Xiaoyun Li, Nicholas B. Fallon, Rebecca Crookall, Timo Giesbrecht, Anna Thomas, Jason C.G. Halford, Joanne Harrold, Andrej Stancak Abstract Insula cortex and hypothalamus are implicated in eating behaviour, and contain receptor sites for peptides and hormones controlling energy balance. Insula encompasses multi-functional subregions, which display differential anatomical and functional connectivities with the […]

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  • Microsaccades mediate a bottom-up mechanism for cross frequency coupling in early visual cortex. Commentary on Lowet et al

    22nd Jan 16

    by Leon Y. Deouell Access the full text article

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  • Extent and Time Course of Competition in Visual Cortex between Emotionally Arousing Distractors and a Concurrent Task

    22nd Jan 16

    by Menton M. Deweese, Matthias Müller, Andreas Keil Abstract Emotionally arousing cues automatically attract attentional resources, which may be at the cost of processing task-related information. Of central importance is how the visual system resolves competition for processing resources among stimuli differing in motivational salience. Here, we assessed the extent and time course of competition […]

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  • Ph.D. Student in Prague/Czech Republic

    21st Jan 16

    The hippocampus, anterior cingulate cortex (ACC) and retrosplenial cortex (RSC) are important for cognitive functions. The present project will aim at elucidating the role of these cortical structures in behavioral flexibility and navigation in a dynamic world. The project will focus on the dynamics of neural representations and attractor networks. It will also test a […]

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  • Ph.D. Student in Erlangen-Nuremberg/Germany

    21st Jan 16

    The group of Prof. C.P. Müller at the Psychiatric and Psychotherapeutic University Hospital of the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nuremberg (FAU) is offering a doctoral position (PhD) with a thematic focus on the neurobiology of alcohol- and methamphetamine addiction. The project investigates the role of the Swiprosin-1/EFhd2 in resilience to drug addiction and will be performed in collaboration […]

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  • Research Fellow (Electrophysiology / Neurobiology) in Melbourne/Australia

    20th Jan 16

    Seeking post-doctoral research fellow to work on drug discovery projects involving G protein coupled receptor targets in the striatum – please see following link (http://www.jobs-monash.jxt.net.au/academic-jobs/research-fellow-electrophysiology-neurobiologist/541221) more

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  • Tenure Track Faculty Position in Neuroscience in Calgary/Canada

    20th Jan 16

    The Department of Cell Biology and Anatomy (http://www.ucalgary.ca/cba/), and the Hotchkiss Brain Institute (HBI; http://www.hbi.ucalgary.ca/) invite applications for a full-time academic position (tenure track), at the Assistant Professor level at University of Calgary. The ideal candidate for this position will be a neuroscientist / cell biologist (broadly defined). We are particularly interested in candidates that […]

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  • The antidepressant-like effect of chronic guanosine treatment is associated with increased hippocampal neuronal differentiation

    19th Jan 16

    by Luis E. B. Bettio, Vivian B. Neis, Francis L. Pazini, Patrícia S. Brocardo, Anna R. Patten, Joana Gil-Mohapel, Brian R. Christie, Ana Lúcia S. Rodrigues Abstract Guanosine is a purine nucleoside that occurs naturally in the central nervous system (CNS), exerting trophic effects. Given its neuroprotective properties, the potential of guanosine as an antidepressant […]

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  • Differential effects of forward and backward masks on the relation between perception and action

    19th Jan 16

    by A Deplancke, L Madelain, Y Coello Abstract A recent series of experiments has shown that the effects of near-threshold stimuli on perceptual and motor responses are highly dependent on experimental conditions. In particular, motor influences of near-threshold distractors were observed when using low contrast unmasked stimuli and high contrast masked stimuli although only the […]

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  • This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    8th Nov 14

    - What's in store for new Senate? Much of the same gridlock and grind - U.S. Senate science panels will have new leadership in wake of Republican takeover - NIH awards initial $46 million for BRAIN Initiative research - Ministers promise basket of gifts for German science - This is what your brain looks like on magic mushrooms - What is it like to control a robotic arm with a brain implant? - Tracking PhD career paths - Journals unite for reproducibility - Could digital badges clarify the roles of co-authors? - What neuro-revolution? The public find brain science irrelevant and anxiety-provoking - Academic science isn't sexist - New paper asserting that sexism in science is over stirs the pot - Science research needs an overhaul

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  • Explore Education and Career Opportunities at Neuroscience 2014

    4th Nov 14

    Attendees can develop professional skills through career-focused workshops and explore graduate schools and job options through events and resources.

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  • Oct. 31, 2014 – This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    1st Nov 14

    - After Election 2014: COMPETES reauthorization  - Should the government fund only science in the "national interest?"   - NIH proceeds with caution on sex balance in biomedical studies  - Scientists implicate more than 100 genes in causing autism  - Not just lazy: Chronic fatigue is real, new brain scans show  - When shared data is not reproducible: Science is broken–but it can be fixed  - Opinion: Separate training from research budgets  - Animal experimentation for medical research must continue, say leading academics

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  • Oct. 24, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    25th Oct 14

    - Neuroscientists speak out against brain game hype - The absurd claim that only Republicans are to blame for cuts to Ebola research - New antidepressant: Rapid agent restores pleasure-seeking ahead of other antidepressant action - See-through sensors open new window into the brain - Brain scans show cause of seasonal affective disorder - "I’m not a scientist" is a dangerous cop-out - Jeffrey Kahn's odd views on animal research

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  • Oct. 17, 2014 – This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    18th Oct 14

    - Ebola vaccine would likely have been found by now if not for budget cuts: NIH Director - NIH director, Sen. Roy Blunt discuss research funding in medical school visit - Scientists caught in Chinese anti-corruption sweep - Breakthrough replicates human brain cells for use in Alzheimer's research - Scientists find cells self-repair the brain after stroke - Distinguished South African Professor Tebello Nyokong on science, education and innovation - How to ensure ethical animal testing - Revealed: EU science chief promised to be "flexible" towards Israel's war crimes

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  • FENS and SfN Issue Joint Statement on Non-human Primate Research

    11th Oct 14

    Following recent attacks by extremists against scientists at the Max Planck Institute for Biological Cybernetics in Tubingen, Germany, the Federation of European Neuroscience Societies (FENS) and the Society for Neuroscience (SfN) have released a statement.

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  • Oct. 10, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    11th Oct 14

    - Nobel Prize in medicine awarded for discovery of brain’s ‘GPS’ - Microscope work wins Nobel Prize in Chemistry - Europe’s brain project is ‘back on track’ - Marmosets are stars of Japan’s ambitious brain project - The BRAIN Initiative and Grand Challenge Scholars - Glut of postdoc researchers stirs quiet crisis in science - A glimpse into the inner workings of the 3D brain: Researchers build computer models to explore how memories form - How do you make Republicans care about animal testing? Anthony Bellotti has a plan - A call to those who care about Europe’s science

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  • Oct. 3, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    4th Oct 14

    - More Groups Join Project on the Brain - Battle Between NSF and House Science Committee Escalates: How Did it Get this Bad? - Can the United States Avoid Another Government Shutdown? - The Federal Government Shut Down One Year Ago Today. Here's How We Covered It — in 8 Front Pages. - Scientists Are Not Trusted By Americans - Here's Why - Science Gone Social - Protein in Brain Identified As Contributor to Alzheimer's Disease, Frontotemporal Dementia - Don't Let Animal Rights Restrict Biomedical Research - Young, Brilliant, and Underfunded - Cognitive Scientist Steven Pinker Writes on Why Academic Writing is so Opaque - 3,000 French Scientists Are Marching to Demand More Research Funding

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  • Sept. 26, 2014 – This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    27th Sep 14

    - After the NIH funding 'euphoria' comes the 'hangover' - Strengthening safety and security across the U.S. life sciences research enterprise - New Washington player joins push for NIH funding - National Institutes of Health will examine 'effect of sex' in preclinical testing - How a failed experiment on rats sparked a billion-dollar infant-care breakthrough - Strange new type of brain cell discovered - How neuroscience can teach children about mental health - There's not a creativity deficit in science - Op-Ed: Crowdfunding for medical research hits a new high

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  • Sept. 19, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    20th Sep 14

    - House votes to arm Syrian rebels; CR passes - Senate approves Obama's Syria plan in funding bill - Too few university jobs for America's young scientists - Scottish independence: Scotland to stay in UK - If you give a mouse a human speech gene, it learns faster - How your brain actually makes decisions while you sleep - Prominent US academics reprise plea for more basic research to fuel innovation - Seven reasons Congress must reauthorize America COMPETES

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  • Sept. 12, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    13th Sep 14

    - House Republicans unveil bill to fund government until December - Science research funding lags for local universities - New public resource to help researchers explore country-specific requirements - Former Portuguese banker gets top European research job - U.S. science suffering from booms and busts in funding - Brainy processing at your fingertips - EXCLUSIVE: Nature reviewers not persuaded by initial STAP stem cell papers - Science cuts 'fiscally irresponsible', Boyer lecture biologist says - Air France accepts responsibility - without animal transports the European research space will be significantly disrupted - Diversity in STEM: what it is and why it matters

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  • Policy and Advocacy Events at Neuroscience 2014

    9th Sep 14

    Interested in science policy and advocacy? Consider attending these events and start planning your itinerary.

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  • Sept. 5, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    6th Sep 14

    - Roundtable envisions better future for U.S. health care innovation - September is National Biosafety Stewardship Month - Medical research would be 'eroded and lost' by Scottish independence - Female Alzheimer's researchers unite to push for equality, sex-specific studies - Life outside the lab: The ones who got away - Why null results rarely see the light of day - Neuroscience: Where is the brain in the Human Brain Project? - Closing the science gap

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  • Learn More About Careers Beyond the Bench

    2nd Sep 14

    Watch video from the Careers Beyond the Bench workshop to learn about career trajectories of individuals in non-academic settings.

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  • BrainFacts.org Blog: Funding Research with Ice Buckets and Coffee Money

    2nd Sep 14

    A new post on the BrainFacts.org blog by Dwayne Godwin details why the ALS Ice Bucket Challenge, while staggering in its success, is not a substitute for government funding for research.

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  • Aug. 29, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    30th Aug 14

    - Research funding cuts to top $6 billion, Labor says - How tech could spell the end of animals in drugs testing - Animal welfare accreditation questioned - NIH to probe racial disparity in grant awards - How movies manipulate your brain to keep you entertained - Study finds that brains with autism fail to trim synapses as they develop - Commentary: A looming crisis in medical research - Pouring water on opponents of animal research

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  • A Guide to Journal Publishing: How to Get Published in a Research Journal

    28th Aug 14

    Gain insight into journal publishing and learn more about emerging trends, such as open-access journals.

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  • Upcoming Webinar: Creating Individual Development Plans

    22nd Aug 14

    Register for the September 17 webinar to learn how an IDP can be used to help employees reach career goals, improve current job performance, and assist in tailoring individual training as part of the overall mentoring process.

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  • Aug. 22, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    22nd Aug 14

    - NSF awards $10.8 million in early concept grants for brain research - Benefunder to launch new funding channel for higher education research - CBO expects no further across-the-board cuts this fiscal year - Iran's moderate president loses a minister-and some momentum for reform - Stephen F. Heinemann, Salk pioneer in brain disease research - Peek into brain shows how kids learn math skills - Abbott wins $19.5 million contract to develop brain injury test - Who governs science? - The curious incident of the fly in the night - Ice bucket challenge underscores damaging cuts to federal NIH funding

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  • Aug. 15, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    16th Aug 14

    - UK grants Chile matching funds for program on scientific research and innovation - International Brain Bee winner announced - Scientists have created the most realistic fake brain tissue ever - In the brain, memories are inextricably tied to place - U.S. fast-tracking process toward human testing of Ebola vaccine - Nepal 'still struggling' to harness science for development - I believe in animal research. But it's time to draw a line

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  • Aug. 8, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    9th Aug 14

    - Prominent U.S. research institutions announce collaboration toward sharing and standardizing neuroscience data - NIH to launch early Ebola vaccine trial in September - Against all odds: Women in developing countries succeed in STEM fields - In science, it matters that women come last - IBM chip processes data similar to the way your brain does - Young scientists use crowd sourcing to fund their research - Shared brain activity predicts audience preferences - Shift in research strategy needed to forestall ills of aging - Expert reaction to Norman Baker's comments on animal research

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  • Aug. 1, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    2nd Aug 14

    - NIH director's statement on Dr. Landis's retirement - International Brain Bee world championship spotlights young neuroscience scholars - NIH advocates gear up for budget fight - Transparency promised for vilified impact factor - Watch 80,000 neurons fire in the brain of a fish - New tools help neuroscientists analyze 'big data' - NIH scientists find six new genetic risk factors for Parkinson's - Hype over Census Bureau STEM report is overblown - Let's spend more wisely on research in Australia - Americans deserve effective science funding - The starving of Canadian science

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  • July 25, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    26th Jul 14

    - Republicans prep short-term funding to keep government open through Election Day - Government must double funding for innovation to compete, admits Vince Cable - Cora Marrett steps down as NSF deputy director - Funding review casting shadow over Portuguese research could cloud other countries - Senate bill backs NSF's practices and calls for big funding boost - Neuroscientists go to Washington - as advocates for science - Spark for a stagnant search - Amid growing concern over head injuries, California limits full-contact football practices - Director's blog: Mapping the risk architecture of mental disorders - Science advisers should be supported, not sacked

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  • Webinar Recording Available: Communicating Your Science to the Non-Expert

    25th Jul 14

    Learn how to develop a short but informative way to communicate your research to a non-scientific audience and read the Twitter conversation that accompanied the webinar.

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  • Save the Date: American Brain Coalition Webinar on BRAIN Initiative

    23rd Jul 14

    Register for the webinar on July 31 to receive an update on the BRAIN Initiative.

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  • July 18, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    19th Jul 14

    - Research!America wants candidates on record about research funding - Botswana approves Innovation Fund - Research coming under pressure - FDA facing criticism over lack of transparency in allocating funds for science projects - Alzheimer's findings seen as a possible new window to understanding the disease - The scientific community is still freaking out about sequestration - Humans already use way, way more than 10 percent of their brains - Mapping a bolder plan for the brain - Defending the grand vision of the Human Brain Project - Bad science muckrakers question the big science status quo

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  • July 11, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    12th Jul 14

    - Scientists threaten to boycott €1.2bn Human Brain Project - Discovery science powered, increasingly, by donors - On tap: Funding, elections, dysfunction - US military developing brain implants to restore memory - R.I.P Portuguese science - Consciousness on-off switch discovered deep in brain - Your brain on magic mushrooms is actually similar to dreaming, brain scan study shows - Probing brain's depth, trying to aid memory - Invest in NIH research - Not all plagiarism requires a retraction - FDA urged to update regulations for informed consent

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  • Communicating Your Science to the Non-Expert: An Online Workshop

    8th Jul 14

    Participate in SfN's first interactive webinar and learn how to develop a short but informative way to communicate your research to a non-scientific audience.

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  • July 4, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    4th Jul 14

    - Can Europe map the human brain? - Data check: U.S. producing more STEM graduates even without proposed initiatives - French science needs 'smarter' spending, OECD says - Secrets of the creative brain - Noninvasive brain control is real - and that's good - Q&A: Life after a PhD - Basic research still the best bet to boost S&T innovation - A thriving research sector is not just about the money

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  • June 27, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    28th Jun 14

    - Brain wave hits California - Safety groups target brain impact of headers in soccer - CSIRO funding cuts driven by 'pure ignorance', says staff association - Record numbers apply for Horizon 2020 first-round funding - Universities in India continue animal experiments - This is the brain circuit that makes you shy - Science fiction come true: Moving a paralyzed hand with the power of thought - Fix the link where science and policy meet - Undermining a cornerstone of medical research - examining a biased commentary on animal studies

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  • June 20, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    21st Jun 14

    - NIH presses journals to focus on reproducibility of studies - $140 million government funding cuts to the CSIRO will have huge impacts on scientific research in Australia - £2.3 million to support science in schools - Professor Colin Blakemore receives knighthood - Sophisticated camera captures all firing neurons - Leadership lessons from science - Your Call: Should animals be used for scientific testing? - Basic neuroscience research with nonhuman primates: a small but indispensable component of biomedical research - A tale of two sexes

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  • Advocacy Webinar Recording Available

    17th Jun 14

    The recording of SfN's most recent webinar, Advocacy Activities: Good for You, Your Institution, and the Field, is now available.

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  • June 13, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    13th Jun 14

    - Give, and it will be given to you - Unlocking the brain: are we entering a golden age of neuroscience? - Bipartisan work on spending bills faces Senate test - Behind the bionic legs that will kick off World Cup 2014 - Rats show regret after wrong choices, scientists say - Time to speak up for research - Cutting budgets for medical research is dangerous

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  • June 6, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    7th Jun 14

    - Student goes to Washington to advocate for increased neuroscience funding - Science funding cuts are generating fears for jobs and research output - Symbolic slap at social sciences - German politicians break research funding impasse - NIH puts $4.5 billion price tag on project to map human brain - Senate confirms Sylvia Mathews Burwell as new secretary of HHS - Repairing the brain - Flashes of light show how memories are made - What's lost as handwriting fades - Animal research can be justified - but 'cuteness' is irrelevant - Mentorship matters for the biomedical workforce

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  • May 30, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    31st May 14

    - Amidst partisan split, U.S. House panel approves controversial NSF bill - German politicians break research funding impasse - A disaster for European science - Building Africa's scientific infrastructure - Scottish independence would damage research funding, warn medical experts - Military plans to test brain implants to fight mental disorders - "Undemocracy": inequalities in science

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  • May 23, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    24th May 14

    - Democrat assault on FIRST bill delays vote by House science panel - Replication effort provokes praise-and 'bullying' charges - Chinese agencies announce open-access policies - German science leaders to politicians: Break funding impasse now - Mice run for fun, not just work, research shows - Is social science research in the national interest? - Federal cuts cause big drop in medical researchers

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  • Deadline Extended for Latin American Training Program Associates

    23rd May 14

    Graduate students and postdoctoral candidates from Latin America and the Caribbean are eligible to apply for the first year of the online program.

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  • May 16, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    17th May 14

    - Labs are told to start including a neglected variable: Females - UK institutions sign up to animal-research openness - Bioethicists warn BRAIN Initiative against repeating past mistakes - Australia shakes up science budget - Salmon over science: House spending panel goes fishing at the expense of NSF and census - U.S. House passes permanent R&D tax credit - House Committee on Energy and Commerce: Subcommittee on Health Meeting

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  • Submit Your Application for the Neuroscience Scholars Program

    14th May 14

    The program is open to underrepresented and diverse neuroscience graduate students and postdoctoral researchers. Applications accepted through May 23.

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  • May 9, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    10th May 14

    - Conflict swirls as U.S. House nears vote on permanent R&D tax break - Campaign targeting animal experimenter causes uproar in Germany - Finding a path to 21st century cures - Excessive regulations turning scientists into bureaucrats - Wiring of retina reveals how eyes sense motion - What makes Congress’s latest effort to curb science funding so dangerous?

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  • May 2, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    3rd May 14

    - Why animal researchers are ending their silence - UK proposes greater transparency on animal research - U.S. science chiefs field questions, hard and soft, at innovation hearing - Science investment by state 'can increase private spending' - House spending panel backs NSF, NASA science - NSF's science board criticizes bill to alter agency's programs - Male researchers stress out rodents - Federal funding drives innovation

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  • April 25, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    26th Apr 14

    - Fattah continues neuroscience advocacy in four speeches this week - NIH director: Budget cuts put U.S. science at risk - Stanford launches center to strengthen quality of scientific research worldwide - Brain-mapping milestones - Senate approps wants you! (To talk about research) - Brain control in a flash of light - Meaningful activities protect the brain from depression

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  • April 18, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    18th Apr 14

    - NIH and AHRQ announce updated policy for application submission - Animals with human rights will be more than a pet peeve for researchers - H.R. 4472: US-Israel Global Neuroscience Partnership Act of 2014 - Finding may explain why women more likely develop Alzheimer's - Videos: A (very) close look inside the zebrafish brain - Rescuing US biomedical research from its systemic flaws - Brain scans: Don’t throw out the baby with the dead salmon

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  • April 11, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    12th Apr 14

    - House passes Ryan budget - UCSF doctor's brain health registry could dramatically cut research costs - RIP, K.C. - Congressmen Smith, Fattah Announce Bipartisan Bill to Boost Alzheimer's Research and Int'l Action Plan - Watch proteins do the jitterbug - Paralyzed men move again with spinal stimulation - Neuroscientists, you now have no excuse not to share raw data

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  • April 4, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    5th Apr 14

    - At House science panel hearing, sarcasm rules - Neurological institute finds worrisome drop in basic research - DARPA launches biological technologies office - Ukraine's science in turmoil - Lean times ahead for Russian Science Academy - Scientists unveil first wiring diagram of mouse's brain - Scientists create an unprecedented map of the developing human brain

    Read More
  • NSF Seeking Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research Proposals

    29th Mar 14

    As part of the U.S. BRAIN Initiative, NSF is seeking Early Concept Grants for Exploratory Research (EAGER) proposals with the potential to transform our ability to analyze brain function underlying behavioral and cognitive processes.

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  • Highlights from Capitol Hill Day 2014

    28th Mar 14

    SfN members met with more than 75 congressional offices on March 26 to advocate for scientific research.

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  • NMDAR-Regulated Dynamics of Layer 4 Neuronal Dendrites during Thalamocortical Reorganization in Neonates

    27th Mar 14

    Hidenobu Mizuno, Wenshu Luo, Etsuko Tarusawa, Yoshikazu M. Saito, Takuya Sato, Yumiko Yoshimura, Shigeyoshi Itohara, Takuji Iwasato. Thalamocortical (TC) connectivity is reorganized by thalamic inputs during postnatal development; however, the dynamic characteristics of TC reorganization and the underlying mechanisms remain une....

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  • Soluble Aβ Oligomers Are Rapidly Sequestered from Brain ISF In Vivo and Bind GM1 Ganglioside on Cellular Membranes

    27th Mar 14

    Soyon Hong, Beth L. Ostaszewski, Ting Yang, Tiernan T. O’Malley, Ming Jin, Katsuhiko Yanagisawa, Shaomin Li, Tim Bartels, Dennis J. Selkoe. Soluble Aβ oligomers contribute importantly to synaptotoxicity in Alzheimer’s disease, but their dynamics in vivo remain unclear. Here, we found that soluble Aβ oligomers were sequestered from bra....

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  • Register for the Neurobiology of Disease Webinar

    25th Mar 14

    The May 6 webinar will bring together faculty from the sold-out 2013 Neurobiology of Disease Workshop for a discussion on the advantages and disadvantages of using iPSCs technology.

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  • March 21, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    22nd Mar 14

    - Brain-mapping projects to join forces - Picking the brain of a noted UA neurobiologist - Billionaires with big ideas are privatizing American science - House Committee on Appropriations: Subcommittee on Labor, Health and Human Services, Education, and Related Agencies Meeting - Neuroscience: Tuning the brain

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  • Translaminar Inhibitory Cells Recruited by Layer 6 Corticothalamic Neurons Suppress Visual Cortex

    20th Mar 14

    Dante S. Bortone, Shawn R. Olsen, Massimo Scanziani. In layer 6 (L6), a principal output layer of the mammalian cerebral cortex, a population of excitatory neurons defined by the NTSR1-Cre mouse line inhibit cortical responses to visual stimuli. Her....

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  • Human CFEOM1 Mutations Attenuate KIF21A Autoinhibition and Cause Oculomotor Axon Stalling

    20th Mar 14

    Long Cheng, Jigar Desai, Carlos J. Miranda, Jeremy S. Duncan, Weihong Qiu, Alicia A. Nugent, Adrianne L. Kolpak, Carrie C. Wu, Eugene Drokhlyansky, Michelle M. Delisle, Wai-Man Chan, Yan Wei, Friedrich Propst, Samara L. Reck-Peterson, Bernd Fritzsch, Elizabeth C. Engle. The ocular motility disorder “Congenital fibrosis of the extraocular muscles type 1” (CFEOM1) results from heterozygous mutations altering the motor and third coiled-coil stalk of the anterograde ....

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  • Urge Your Representatives to Support Efforts to Increase Funding for NIH

    19th Mar 14

    Take two minutes to urge your representatives to reverse cuts to NIH and reaffirm the United States' commitment to investment in biomedical research.

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  • Modulation of Electrotonic Coupling in the Inferior Olive by Inhibitory and Excitatory Inputs: Integration in the Glomerulus

    19th Mar 14

    Jornt R. De Gruijl, Piotr A. Sokół, Mario Negrello, Chris I. De Zeeuw. Dendritic spines in glomeruli of the inferior olive are coupled by gap junctions and receive both inhibitory and excitatory inputs. In this issue of Neuron, Lefler et al. (2014), Mathy et a....

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  • Active Dendrites under Parental Supervision

    19th Mar 14

    Thomas G. Oertner. Pyramidal cell dendrites are able to produce a variety of active calcium signals in brain slices. In this issue of Neuron, Grienberger et al. (2014) investigate dendritic function in the hi....

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  • The Light Touch of Delta Opioid Receptors

    19th Mar 14

    Wendy Imlach, Macdonald J. Christie. Expression of δ-opioid receptors in sensory neurons is controversial. In this issue of Neuron, Bardoni et al. (2014) present evidence that DOPrs are expressed on mechanosensory neurons invo....

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  • Placebo Analgesia: A Predictive Coding Perspective

    19th Mar 14

    Christian Büchel, Stephan Geuter, Christian Sprenger, Falk Eippert. This Perspective reviews recent findings in placebo hypoalgesia and provides a conceptual account of how expectations and experience can lead to placebo hypoalgesia. In particular, we put forward ....

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  • Multisensory Integration: Flexible Use of General Operations

    19th Mar 14

    Nienke van Atteveldt, Micah M. Murray, Gregor Thut, Charles E. Schroeder. Research into the anatomical substrates and “principles” for integrating inputs from separate sensory surfaces has yielded divergent findings. This suggests that multisensory integration is flexib....

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  • Vertebrate Cone Opsins Enable Sustained and Highly Sensitive Rapid Control of Gi/o Signaling in Anxiety Circuitry

    19th Mar 14

    Olivia A. Masseck, Katharina Spoida, Deniz Dalkara, Takashi Maejima, Johanna M. Rubelowski, Lutz Wallhorn, Evan S. Deneris, Stefan Herlitze. G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) coupling to Gi/o signaling pathways are involved in the control of important physiological functions, which are difficult to investigate because of t....

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  • Enhancement of Inhibitory Neurotransmission by GABAA Receptors Having α2,3-Subunits Ameliorates Behavioral Deficits in a Mouse Model of Autism

    19th Mar 14

    Sung Han, Chao Tai, Christina J. Jones, Todd Scheuer, William A. Catterall. Autism spectrum disorder (ASD) may arise from increased ratio of excitatory to inhibitory neurotransmission in the brain. Many pharmacological treatments have been tested in ASD, but only limited ....

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  • Synaptically Induced Long-Term Modulation of Electrical Coupling in the Inferior Olive

    19th Mar 14

    Alexandre Mathy, Beverley A. Clark, Michael Häusser. Electrical coupling mediated by gap junctions is widespread in the mammalian CNS, and the interplay between chemical and electrical synapses on the millisecond timescale is crucial for determining....

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  • Whole-Brain Activity Maps Reveal Stereotyped, Distributed Networks for Visuomotor Behavior

    19th Mar 14

    Ruben Portugues, Claudia E. Feierstein, Florian Engert, Michael B. Orger. Most behaviors, even simple innate reflexes, are mediated by circuits of neurons spanning areas throughout the brain. However, in most cases, the distribution and dynamics of firing patterns of th....

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  • Functional Architecture of an Optic Flow-Responsive Area that Drives Horizontal Eye Movements in Zebrafish

    19th Mar 14

    Fumi Kubo, Bastian Hablitzel, Marco Dal Maschio, Wolfgang Driever, Herwig Baier, Aristides B. Arrenberg. Animals respond to whole-field visual motion with compensatory eye and body movements in order to stabilize both their gaze and position with respect to their surroundings. In zebrafish, rotationa....

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  • Dorsal Raphe Neurons Signal Reward through 5-HT and Glutamate

    19th Mar 14

    Zhixiang Liu, Jingfeng Zhou, Yi Li, Fei Hu, Yao Lu, Ming Ma, Qiru Feng, Ju-en Zhang, Daqing Wang, Jiawei Zeng, Junhong Bao, Ji-Young Kim, Zhou-Feng Chen, Salah El Mestikawy, Minmin Luo. The dorsal raphe nucleus (DRN) in the midbrain is a key center for serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT)-expressing neurons. Serotonergic neurons in the DRN have been theorized to encode punishmen....

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  • NMDA Receptor Activation Strengthens Weak Electrical Coupling in Mammalian Brain

    19th Mar 14

    Josef Turecek, Genevieve S. Yuen, Victor Z. Han, Xiao-Hui Zeng, K. Ulrich Bayer, John P. Welsh. Electrical synapses are formed by gap junctions and permit electrical coupling, which shapes the synchrony of neuronal ensembles. Here, we provide a direct demonstration of receptor-mediated stren....

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  • Cerebellar Inhibitory Input to the Inferior Olive Decreases Electrical Coupling and Blocks Subthreshold Oscillations

    19th Mar 14

    Yaara Lefler, Yosef Yarom, Marylka Yoe Uusisaari. GABAergic projection neurons in the cerebellar nuclei (CN) innervate the inferior olive (IO) that in turn is the source of climbing fibers targeting Purkinje neurons in the cerebellar cortex. Anat....

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  • Deliberation and Commitment in the Premotor and Primary Motor Cortex during Dynamic Decision Making

    19th Mar 14

    David Thura, Paul Cisek. Neurophysiological studies of decision making have primarily focused on decisions about information that is stable over time. However, during natural behavior, animals make decisions in a constant....

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  • Intrinsic Connectivity Identifies the Hippocampus as a Main Crossroad between Alzheimer’s and Semantic Dementia-Targeted Networks

    19th Mar 14

    Renaud La Joie, Brigitte Landeau, Audrey Perrotin, Alexandre Bejanin, Stéphanie Egret, Alice Pélerin, Florence Mézenge, Serge Belliard, Vincent de La Sayette, Francis Eustache, Béatrice Desgranges, Gaël Chételat. Alzheimer’s disease (AD) and semantic dementia (SD) are both characterized by severe atrophy in the hippocampus, a brain region underlying episodic memory; paradoxically, episodic memory is relati....

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  • Adaptive Gain Control during Human Perceptual Choice

    19th Mar 14

    Samuel Cheadle, Valentin Wyart, Konstantinos Tsetsos, Nicholas Myers, Vincent de Gardelle, Santiago Herce Castañón, Christopher Summerfield. Neural systems adapt to background levels of stimulation. Adaptive gain control has been extensively studied in sensory systems but overlooked in decision-theoretic models. Here, we describe evide....

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  • Astrocyte-Derived Endothelin-1 Inhibits Remyelination through Notch Activation

    19th Mar 14

    Timothy R. Hammond, Ana Gadea, Jeff Dupree, Christophe Kerninon, Brahim Nait-Oumesmar, Adan Aguirre, Vittorio Gallo.

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  • Neuronal Machinery of Sleep Homeostasis in Drosophila

    19th Mar 14

    Jeffrey M. Donlea, Diogo Pimentel, Gero Miesenböck.

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  • Retinal Input Directs the Recruitment of Inhibitory Interneurons into Thalamic Visual Circuits

    19th Mar 14

    Bruno Golding, Gabrielle Pouchelon, Camilla Bellone, Sahana Murthy, Ariel A. Di Nardo, Subashika Govindan, Masahuro Ogawa, Tomomi Shimogori, Christian Lüscher, Alexandre Dayer, Denis Jabaudon.

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  • Delta Opioid Receptors Presynaptically Regulate Cutaneous Mechanosensory Neuron Input to the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

    19th Mar 14

    Rita Bardoni, Vivianne L. Tawfik, Dong Wang, Amaury François, Carlos Solorzano, Scott A. Shuster, Papiya Choudhury, Chiara Betelli, Colleen Cassidy, Kristen Smith, Joriene C. de Nooij, Françoise Mennicken, Dajan O’Donnell, Brigitte L. Kieffer, C. Jeffrey Woodbury, Allan I. Basbaum, Amy B. MacDermott, Grégory Scherrer.

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  • March 14, 2014 -This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    15th Mar 14

    - France Cordova takes over as NSF Director - First step for FIRST bill exposes party differences - Animal rights extremists increasingly targeting individuals - China goes back to basics on research funding - Up to 1000 NIH investigators dropped out last year - H.R. 4176: To establish a position of Science Laureate of the United States - Biomarkers could predict Alzheimer's before it starts

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  • U.S. Legislators Celebrate Brain Awareness Week

    15th Mar 14

    Legislators are joining in Brain Awareness Week celebrations. Click through for the full list.

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  • WIDE AWAKE Mediates the Circadian Timing of Sleep Onset

    13th Mar 14

    Sha Liu, Angelique Lamaze, Qili Liu, Masashi Tabuchi, Yong Yang, Melissa Fowler, Rajnish Bharadwaj, Julia Zhang, Joseph Bedont, Seth Blackshaw, Thomas E. Lloyd, Craig Montell, Amita Sehgal, Kyunghee Koh, Mark N. Wu. How the circadian clock regulates the timing of sleep is poorly understood. Here, we identify a Drosophila mutant, wide awake (wake), that exhibits a marked delay in sleep ons....

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  • Microglial CR3 Activation Triggers Long-Term Synaptic Depression in the Hippocampus via NADPH Oxidase

    13th Mar 14

    Jingfei Zhang, Aqsa Malik, Hyun B. Choi, Rebecca W.Y. Ko, Lasse Dissing-Olesen, Brian A. MacVicar. Complement receptor 3 (CR3) activation in microglia is involved in neuroinflammation-related brain disorders and pruning of neuronal synapses. Hypoxia, often observed together with neuroinflammati....

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  • Latin American Training Program Announced

    12th Mar 14

    Graduate students and postdoctoral candidates from Latin America and the Caribbean are eligible to apply for the first year of the online program.

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  • March 7, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    8th Mar 14

    - White House: Modest 2015 R&D budget proposal, but with a twist - New study ranks Alzheimer's as third-leading cause of death, after heart disease and cancer - Slow recovery for embattled Spanish research agency - FY2015 Federal Research and Development Budget Briefing - How fat may hurt the brain, and how exercise may help

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  • President's Budget Released

    8th Mar 14

    On March 4, President Obama released his fiscal year 2015 budget. Learn what this means for NIH and NSF.

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  • Apply for a Travel Award to the Japan Neuroscience Meeting

    7th Mar 14

    North American graduate students and postdoctoral candidates can apply through April 3 to receive a travel award to help cover the cost of attending the meeting.

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  • Striatal Cholinergic Interneurons Drive GABA Release from Dopamine Terminals

    6th Mar 14

    Alexandra B. Nelson, Nora Hammack, Cindy F. Yang, Nirao M. Shah, Rebecca P. Seal, Anatol C. Kreitzer. Striatal cholinergic interneurons are implicated in motor control, associative plasticity, and reward-dependent learning. Synchronous activation of cholinergic interneurons triggers large inhibito....

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  • Representation of Geometric Borders in the Developing Rat

    6th Mar 14

    Tale L. Bjerknes, Edvard I. Moser, May-Britt Moser. Local space is represented by a number of functionally specific cell types, including place cells in the hippocampus and grid cells, head direction cells, and border cells in the medial entorhinal....

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  • Feb. 28, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    1st Mar 14

    - A bright future for brain research - Smith and Bucshon: Investing in science research to keep America competitive - Alan Alda, spokesman for science - A White House call to action to advance the BRAIN Initiative - Does medicine really need lab mice? - Oversight hearing - Federal investments in neuroscience research - Naturally occurring packets show promise for protecting nerve fibers in the brain - A campaign to elect scientists

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  • Novel Primate miRNAs Coevolved with Ancient Target Genes in Germinal Zone-Specific Expression Patterns

    27th Feb 14

    Mary L. Arcila, Marion Betizeau, Xiaolu A. Cambronne, Elmer Guzman, Nathalie Doerflinger, Frantz Bouhallier, Hongjun Zhou, Bian Wu, Neha Rani, Danielle S. Bassett, Ugo Borello, Cyril Huissoud, Richard H. Goodman, Colette Dehay, Kenneth S. Kosik. Major nonprimate-primate differences in corticogenesis include the dimensions, precursor lineages, and developmental timing of the germinal zones (GZs). microRNAs (miRNAs) of laser-dissected GZ co....

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  • Delta Opioid Receptors Presynaptically Regulate Cutaneous Mechanosensory Neuron Input to the Spinal Cord Dorsal Horn

    27th Feb 14

    Rita Bardoni, Vivianne L. Tawfik, Dong Wang, Amaury François, Carlos Solorzano, Scott A. Shuster, Papiya Choudhury, Chiara Betelli, Colleen Cassidy, Kristen Smith, Joriene C. de Nooij, Françoise Mennicken, Dajan O’Donnell, Brigitte L. Kieffer, C. Jeffrey Woodbury, Allan I. Basbaum, Amy B. MacDermott, Grégory Scherrer. Cutaneous mechanosensory neurons detect mechanical stimuli that generate touch and pain sensation. Although opioids are generally associated only with the control of pain, here we report that the ....

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  • Feb. 21, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    22nd Feb 14

    - U.S. dominance in science faces Asian challenge - Dispute over the future of basic research in Canada - E.U. postpones Horizon 2020 talks with Switzerland after immigration vote - Pentagon considers using electricity to stimulate troops' brains - Parkinson's human trial suspended - Request for Information (RFI): Soliciting input on planned extramural training activities relevant to data reproducibility - U.S. biomedical research: We must reverse a decade of neglect - Opinions about scientific advances blur party-political lines

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  • Register for the Upcoming Neuroscience Departments and Programs Webinar

    21st Feb 14

    The March 13 webinar will present three examples of programs that have strengthened their ability to enhance diversity in their scientific programs and the lessons they have learned along the way. The program is presented by SfN’s Committee on Neuroscience Departments and Programs.

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  • NMDA Receptor-Dependent Multidendrite Ca2+ Spikes Required for Hippocampal Burst Firing In Vivo

    20th Feb 14

    Christine Grienberger, Xiaowei Chen, Arthur Konnerth. High-frequency bursts of action potentials (APs) are a distinctive form of signaling in various types of mammalian central neurons. In CA1 hippocampal pyramidal neurons in vivo, such complex spike....

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  • A Transcription Factor Network Coordinates Attraction, Repulsion, and Adhesion Combinatorially to Control Motor Axon Pathway Selection

    20th Feb 14

    Aref Arzan Zarin, Jamshid Asadzadeh, Karsten Hokamp, Daniel McCartney, Long Yang, Greg J. Bashaw, Juan-Pablo Labrador. Combinations of transcription factors (TFs) instruct precise wiring patterns in the developing nervous system; however, how these factors impinge on surface molecules that control guidance decisio....

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  • Feb. 14, 2014 - This Week's Consolidation of Advocacy News

    15th Feb 14

    - Harper unveils new fund for Canadian research excellence - Swiss vote to curb immigration could hamper research - Bill to keep scientific research from public view to be heard on Monday - 'No target' in UK animal tests plan - Might brain implants help restore memory loss from combat injuries? - Why so munchy? Cannabis shown to ramp up sense of smell - Science at the sharp end of oppressive politics

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  • Apply for FENS Summer School 2014

    10th Jan 14

    Applications are being accepted for the FENS-SfN summer school on “Neurodevelopmental Psychiatric Disorders” until February 3.

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  • Apply for Travel Awards to the FENS Forum in Milan

    19th Dec 13

    North American graduate students and postdoctoral candidates can apply to receive a $2,000 stipend to help cover the cost of attending the forum.

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  • NeurOnLine: Let's Talk Neuroscience

    7th Aug 13

    Voice your opinion and keep up with colleagues on NeurOnLine, an online community where thousands of neuroscience professionals network, collaborate, and share ideas.

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  • Connect with SfN Colleagues and Peers with the NeurOnLine Mobile App

    5th Aug 13

    SfN is pleased to introduce the mobile app for NeurOnLine.

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